Stephen Bright Named Attorney of the Year

Stephen B. Bright, professor of practice, was honored with Attorney of the Year Award at the Daily Report‘s annual Professional Excellence awards dinner June 29.

Bright was commended for his four decades of serving indigent clients facing the death penalty and his advocacy of the right to counsel for poor people accused of… more »

Bright Wins Supreme Court Case, ‘McWilliams v. Dunn,’ in 2017 Term

Imagine walking into a classroom to learn from an attorney who just won a U.S. Supreme Court case. Georgia State Law students do so, learning from one of the South’s sharpest legal minds when they enter Stephen B. Bright’s class.

Bright, former president and senior counsel of the Southern Center for Human Rights (SCHR) has… more »

Segall on Why There Should Be Cameras in the U.S. Supreme Court

Posted On June 15, 2017 by Eric Segall, Kathy and Lawrence Ashe Professor of Law

Former FBI Director James B. Comey’s open testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee last Thursday, broadcast live on national television, reflected well on our democracy. An estimated 19.5 million people watched our government at work.

Cameras at the U.S. Supreme Court Segall: “Cameras Belong in… more »

To Fix Confirmation Process We Need to Face the Truth About SCOTUS

As the dust settles over the bitterly partisan confirmation battles over Judge Garland and Justice Gorsuch, there is a large consensus that the Supreme Court is a damaged if not broken institution. Liberal commentators have been speculating, for the first time in 85 years, about the possibility of a Court packing plan the next time… more »

Ten Questions for Judge Neil Gorsuch

Posted On March 17, 2017 by By Eric Segall, Kathy and Lawrence Ashe Professor of Law

On March 20, the Senate will begin the confirmation hearings for Judge Neil Gorsuch. Based on his meetings with a few Senate Democrats, it appears he will be reluctant, like most nominees, to answer any question relating to his specific views on already decided cases or the existing state of the law. This… more »

Two Sides: Professors on the Supreme Court

Constitutional scholars, Supreme Court commentators and judges and lawyers have long debated whether the Supreme Court is more of a political or legal institution. Given that the justices normally resolve cases implicating unclear constitutional text, contested history and fuzzy precedents, it is not surprising that they have significant discretion to decide cases consistent with their… more »

Why Senate Democrats Should Reject Judge Neil Gorsuch

Professor Fred Smith, in a Feb. 5 Atlanta Journal-Constitution opinion piece, says Democrats should give Judge Neil Gorsuch a respectful and fair hearing. They should, and then they should vote against his confirmation.

The process by which judges are nominated and appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court is a political one, and designed… more »

Supreme Court Should Remain at Eight Justices, Segall Tells Board of Visitors

Eric Segall, the Kathy and Lawrence Ashe Professor of Law, presented his “wild and crazy idea” for the U.S. Supreme Court during the Holiday Luncheon for the Georgia State Law Board of Visitors and Law Alumni Council on Dec. 6. Segall posits that the Court should only have eight justices, evenly divided between… more »

The Trump Court: What’s Next for the Highest Court in the Land

Donald Trump’s election as the 45th president of the United States came as a surprise to many. Regardless of one’s political leanings, most people agree that Trump has at least one important job to do, and he needs to do it soon.

Justice Antonin Scalia, a member of the Supreme Court since 1986, passed away… more »