Archives

Ten Questions for Judge Neil Gorsuch

Posted On March 17, 2017 by By Eric Segall, Kathy and Lawrence Ashe Professor of Law

On March 20, the Senate will begin the confirmation hearings for Judge Neil Gorsuch. Based on his meetings with a few Senate Democrats, it appears he will be reluctant, like most nominees, to answer any question relating to his specific views on already decided cases or the existing state of the law. This… more »

Two Sides: Professors on the Supreme Court

Constitutional scholars, Supreme Court commentators and judges and lawyers have long debated whether the Supreme Court is more of a political or legal institution. Given that the justices normally resolve cases implicating unclear constitutional text, contested history and fuzzy precedents, it is not surprising that they have significant discretion to decide cases consistent with their… more »

Why Senate Democrats Should Reject Judge Neil Gorsuch

Professor Fred Smith, in a Feb. 5 Atlanta Journal-Constitution opinion piece, says Democrats should give Judge Neil Gorsuch a respectful and fair hearing. They should, and then they should vote against his confirmation.

The process by which judges are nominated and appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court is a political one, and designed… more »

Supreme Court Should Remain at Eight Justices, Segall Tells Board of Visitors

Eric Segall, the Kathy and Lawrence Ashe Professor of Law, presented his “wild and crazy idea” for the U.S. Supreme Court during the Holiday Luncheon for the Georgia State Law Board of Visitors and Law Alumni Council on Dec. 6. Segall posits that the Court should only have eight justices, evenly divided between… more »

The Trump Court: What’s Next for the Highest Court in the Land

Donald Trump’s election as the 45th president of the United States came as a surprise to many. Regardless of one’s political leanings, most people agree that Trump has at least one important job to do, and he needs to do it soon.

Justice Antonin Scalia, a member of the Supreme Court since 1986, passed away… more »

Segall: Alexander Hamilton and the New Supreme Court Term

As the Supreme Court’s new term begins, many court watchers have observed that the justices don’t have the usual front-page, nationally important cases on their docket.

By this time a year ago, the Supreme Court had already decided to hear controversial affirmative action, free speech and redistricting cases. Soon thereafter the… more »

Segall: Why We Don’t Need a Ninth Supreme Court Justice

Posted On September 16, 2016 by Eric Segall, Kathy & Lawrence Ashe Professor of Law

The hand-wringers are wrong—an evenly split Supreme Court would end a narrow majority imposing its out-of-step will and would be good for the country.

When the U.S. Supreme Court begins its 2016-17 term in October, the biggest story will not involve a blockbuster case but the still empty seat created by Justice Antonin Scalia’s death… more »

Segall on Who is Justice Clarence Thomas?

This week at the Southeastern Association of American Law Schools Annual Conference, I will be leading a discussion group commemorating the 25th anniversary of the nomination of Justice Clarence Thomas. On this blog, and in law reviews, I have been quite critical of Justice Thomas’ constitutional law jurisprudence. For this post, however, I… more »

Segall on Justice Ginsburg and the Emperor’s New Clothes

Posted On July 15, 2016 by Eric Segall, Kathy & Lawrence Ashe Professor of Law

How does a reliably liberal and feminist Supreme Court Justice get the New York Times Editorial Board, the Washington Post Editorial Board, and approximately 95 percent of Supreme Court commentators and law professors (most of whom reside on the left) to take sides with Donald Trump and against her? Unless you have been on a remote desert… more »

Deadlocked: What a Nine Word Decision Means for Five-Million Undocumented Immigrants

Shana Tabak, Georgia State University

On Thursday, the Supreme Court deadlocked on U.S. v. Texas, the most important immigration case of the year.

Nearly five million people stood to benefit from President Obama’s ambitious policy. It would have delayed deportation of unauthorized immigrants whose children are citizens or legal residents, and whose clean… more »