Segall Debates Blackman on ‘Picking the Next Justices’

Eric J. Segall, Georgia State University Kathy and Lawrence Ashe Professor of Law, faced off against Josh Blackman, associate professor of law at the South Texas College of Law, during a riveting debate, “Picking the Next Justices,” on Oct. 29 for the Georgia State chapter of The Federalist Society.

Appointing… more »

56th Miller Lecture: Internet Revolutionized Creativity, Changing IP Law

“The Internet fundamentally changed Intellectual Property,” said Mark Lemley, author, legal scholar and director of the Law, Science and Technology program at Stanford Law School, during Georgia State University College of Law’s 56th Henry J. Miller Distinguished Lecture Series on Sept. 17.

Lemley, the William H. Neukom Professor of Law, discussed “Intellectual Property in… more »

Playing the Race Card: The Illusion of a Jury of Your Peers

The right to a jury trial serves as the foundation of the American criminal justice system. The Sixth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution guarantees the right to an impartial jury in criminal prosecutions. The Constitution does not define “impartiality,” but the U.S. Supreme Court has held that a jury must be drawn from a… more »

Affordable Care Act Is Here To Stay

On June 25, in King v. Burwell, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the Affordable Care Act’s premium subsidies in federal exchanges in a 6-3 decision, written by Chief Justice John Roberts. This is a huge win for the government and for the millions of people who receive subsidies to buy health insurance on… more »

What’s Wrong with Religious Freedom Restoration Acts?

When Common-Sense Protection Becomes a License to Discriminate

By Lynn Hogue, Professor of Law Emeritus

Government neutrality is at the core of the First Amendment’s Religion Clauses (the Establishment Clause and the Free Exercise Clause). Taken together, these two clauses put government on the sidelines of religious controversy. On the one hand, there can… more »

King v. Burwell Tests the U.S. Supreme Court’s Reputation

If the Supreme Court sides with the plaintiffs in King v. Burwell, and holds that federal tax credits are unavailable for millions of people who purchase their insurance on federal health exchanges, many will suffer needlessly and insurance markets may well be destroyed in 36 states. In addition to the health insurance implications, this case… more »

Hogue Co-Writes Chapter on Religion and Public Health

L. Lynn Hogue, professor of law emeritus at Georgia State University College of Law collaborated with his spouse, Carol Hogue, Emory University’s Jules and Deen Terry Professor of Maternal and Child Health, professor of epidemiology and director of the Women’s and Children’s Center, to contribute a chapter to a collection of… more »