Archives

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America, Noon Tuesday, Oct. 24, Knowles Conference Center

Author Richard Rothstein will be on hand to sign and present his latest book, The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America, which outlines the ways in which racial segregation resulted from flawed urban planning and law and policy decisions that promoted discriminatory patterns still in… more »

Public Interest Organizations Fair: Noon Monday, Oct. 2, Catherine Henson Atrium

The Public Interest Organizations Fair features representatives from several community organizations to talk about their work and how students can get involved. Lunch will be served.

Public Interest Organization Fair When: Noon-1:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 2 Where: Catherine Henson Atrium Lunch provided

For more information, contact the Center for Access to Justice at lawa2j@gsu.edu.

Centers, Certificates and Dual Degrees, Oh My! Info Sessions Sept. 25 and 28

Interested in intellectual property, public interest law, land use/environmental law or health law? Wondering about the Centers for Intellectual Property; Access to Justice, Comparative Study of Metropolitan Growth or Law, Health & Society?

Information Session Session 1: 11:45 a.m. Monday, Sept. 25 Session 2: 5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 28 Where: Room 342 Brown Bag Session; bring your lunch/dinner… more »

The Prosecutor’s Role in Access to Justice, Noon Wednesday, Sept. 27, Knowles Conference Center

Hear from a panel of prosecutors from a variety of levels/counties in the metro Atlanta area discussing how they define “justice” and what they can do to further justice through their exercise of prosecutorial discretion. Lunch will be provided.

The Prosecutor’s Role When: Noon Wednesday, Sept. 27 Where: Knowles Conference Room, Lower Level Lunch provided

Co-sponsored by… more »

Beyond Death Row: Personal Stories from Those Closest to Georgia’s Death Row Inmates, Noon Thursday, Sept. 21, Knowles Conference Center

Join us for a discussion about capital punishment with Mercer Law Professor Sarah Gerwig-Moore; Jameca McGhee, whose father was sentenced to death; and Kayla Gissendaner, whose mother, Kelly, was executed in 2015 after serving nearly 20 years on death row. Lunch will be provided.

Beyond Death Row When: Noon Thursday, Sept. 21 Where: Knowles Conference… more »

Public Interest Keynote, Noon Tuesday, Aug. 22, Ceremonial Courtroom

Stephen Bright, professor of practice and former president and senior counsel with the Southern Center for Human Rights, will deliver the annual Public Interest Keynote address.

Public Interest Keynote When: Noon Tuesday, Aug. 22 Where: Ceremonial Courtroom, Lower Level Lunch provided

After the lecture, the center will introduce the Pro Bono Program and the Public Interest… more »

Stephen Bright Named Attorney of the Year

Stephen B. Bright, professor of practice, was honored with Attorney of the Year Award at the Daily Report‘s annual Professional Excellence awards dinner June 29.

Bright was commended for his four decades of serving indigent clients facing the death penalty and his advocacy of the right to counsel for poor people accused of… more »

Bright Wins Supreme Court Case, ‘McWilliams v. Dunn,’ in 2017 Term

Imagine walking into a classroom to learn from an attorney who just won a U.S. Supreme Court case. Georgia State Law students do so, learning from one of the South’s sharpest legal minds when they enter Stephen B. Bright’s class.

Bright, former president and senior counsel of the Southern Center for Human Rights (SCHR) has… more »

Selimovic (J.D. ’19) Examines Programs for Self-Represented Litigants in Journal Article

Timur Selimovic (J.D. ’19) wrote “Court-Based Self Help Programs,” which outlines four programs developed to improve access to justice and make courts more user-friendly for self-represented litigants, for the Georgia Courts Journal, published by the Administrative Office of the Courts (AOC).

The AOC selected Selimovic to draft the article based on his… more »

Amy BeMent (J.D. ’17): Moot Court Inspires Passion

As a high school government and economics teacher, Amy BeMent (J.D. ’17) exposed her students to several aspects of the law – mock trials, mock legislatures and judicial competitions. After 11 years, she decided that she didn’t want to just teach the law, she wanted to participate in it. Upon the urging of her husband,… more »