Georgia State Law

Eugene Butler (J.D. '20) On Serving as Mr. Georgia State University

Eugene Butler (J.D. '20)

Eugene Butler (J.D. ’20) is a first-year student at Georgia State University College of Law and the 2016-17 Mr. Georgia State University.

Eugene Butler (J.D. ’20) is a first-year student at Georgia State University College of Law and the 2016-17 Mr. Georgia State University. He will pass off his crown to the next Mr. GSU during halftime at the homecoming game on Saturday, Oct. 21. Eugene majored in political science at Georgia State and served in various volunteer positions as an undergraduate student. We asked him a few questions about his undergraduate career and how he’s settling into law school.

What did you do as Mr. Georgia State University?
As Mr. GSU, we coordinate with Spotlight Programs Boards to do various activities that include hosting events, community service, and making appearance requests for the university.

How did you feel being chosen as Mr. GSU?
It is definitely an honor to be Mr. GSU. Throughout my undergraduate career, I served in various capacities within the university, so I thought having this coveted title was a great ending. The process to become Mr. Georgia State starts with an extensive application in which you detail your reasoning for applying, list all campus involvement and community service, include recommendations, disclose your GPA, and a resume. If you meet the requirements, you are then selected for an interview which includes answering questions from a panel of judges throughout the Georgia State community and presenting a creative demonstration of your “Panther Journey.”

You were involved with the Big Brothers Big Sisters program as an undergraduate. What made you decide to get involved with them and what does it mean to you?
I am always looking at ways to help and mentor. I feel the greatest gift is the gift of helping. It is always wise and honorable to lay the foundation for someone else. I believe in leaving a legacy in people and how I make them feel.

Why did you choose to go to law school?
I decided to go to law school because I have always had an interest in advocacy. I feel that law allows a person the opportunity to advocate in many different areas for various people. There is entertainment, families, underprivileged, immigrants, and the list goes on and on.

What career path would you like to pursue, or, what do you hope to do with your law degree?
I am not quite sure of what specific area of law I would like to practice as of now. However, my end goal is to serve on the bench as a judge.

Are you involved in any student organizations at the College of Law?
I am a member of BLSA as well as on the Barrister’s Ball committee for SBA. I plan to expand my involvement as I continue to become acclimated to the wonderful experience which is law school.

How’s your first semester going?
My first semester is full of surprises. In some ways, it is what I expected such as hard work, mentally stimulating, and challenging.  However, I think I missed the part about those characteristics reprising themselves every day. It is also exciting as well.

What do you like to do in your free time?
Free time? What is that? I am a 1L. I have taken on the hobby of sleeping during free time. It is the greatest thing.

What advice do you have for the next Mr. GSU?
I would say that your reign is what you make it. Allow your service and love for such an evolving and innovating school to remain at the forefront of your image, decisions, and attitude throughout.

STLA Team Wins MockingBird Challenge Competition

Georgia State Law’s Student Trial Lawyers Association (STLA) team of Andy Navratil (J.D. ’18), Brandon Reed (J.D. ’18), Casey Wilson (J.D. ’19) and Kevin Mathis (J.D. ’19), won the Mockingbird Challenge in Alabama. The team was coached by alums Cheryl Champion White (J.D. ’93) and Kevin Coleman (J.D. ’15). The program is supervised by Tom Jones.

STLA Mockingbird Challenge

Georgia State Law’s Student Trial Lawyers Association (STLA) team of Andy Navratil (J.D. ’18), Brandon Reed (J.D. ’18), Casey Wilson (J.D. ’19) and Kevin Mathis (J.D. ’19), won the Mockingbird Challenge in Alabama.

This was the first competition for Wilson and Mathis, who were the witnesses, as well as Reed’s first competition as an attorney, which surprised several of the judges because he did such a great job.

All of the teammates dedicated themselves to learning the problem and worked together wonderfully. “The win was a result of team effort and determination,” Mathis said.

The coaches sacrificed their weekends to help the students prepare for the competition.

“We also owe a lot to our coaches Cheryl Champion White, Tom Jones, and Kevin Coleman,” Navratil said. “All three are stellar attorneys who challenged and supported us as we prepared. I am certain that we would not have won without their wise counsel and constant encouragement.”

Navratil won best advocate for his closing argument, Mathis described Navratil’s closing argument as being an “impassioned defense of the accused and a powerful rebuke of the opposing counsel’s case.”