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Supreme Court Should Remain at Eight Justices, Segall Tells Board of Visitors

Eric Segall, the Kathy and Lawrence Ashe Professor of Law, presented his “wild and crazy idea” for the U.S. Supreme Court during the Holiday Luncheon for the Georgia State Law Board of Visitors and Law Alumni Council on Dec. 6. Segall posits that the Court should only have eight justices, evenly divided between… more »

Forensic Evidence Largely Not Supported by Sound Science – Now What?

Forensic science has become a mainstay of many a TV drama, and it’s just as important in real-life criminal trials. Drawing on biology, chemistry, genetics, medicine and psychology, forensic evidence helps answer questions in the legal system. Often, forensics provides the “smoking gun” that links a perpetrator to the crime and ultimately puts the bad… more »

IP LawMeet Team Advances to National Competition

The Georgia State Law Intellectual Property (IP) moot court team won best draft and best team at the Eastern Regional IP LawMeet competition on Oct. 21. They also were selected to compete in the National Rounds, held virtually Nov. 4.

As part of the competition, Steven Williams (J.D. ’17), Seth Meyerson (J.D. ’17)… more »

Learn How to Spend Spring Break Making a Difference at 5 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 18, Room 246

The Center for Access to Justice is organizing two alternative spring break trips: one in Atlanta, with a focus on housing law, and a second in Jackson, Mississippi, with a focus on court-watching in state criminal court.

Information Session When: 5 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 18 Where: Room 246

Interested? Attend an information session at 5… more »

Judge López: Your Professional Reputation Starts in Law School

Doing good should permeate your entire legal career, said DeKalb County State Court Judge Dax López during the Student Bar Association keynote Wednesday during Law Week 2016.

López shared advice drawn from his extensive experience in both the private and public sectors. “When you start your career, you have to do such a good job… more »

Chiovaro, Vath Develop Practice-Ready Writing Course

Teaming up to help ease the transition of graduates from law school to practice are Lawyering Foundations faculty members Jennifer Chiovaro (J.D. ’85) and Margaret Vath with a new simulation course, Lawyering: Practice-Ready Writing.

Chiovaro and Vath say one year of legal writing instruction is not sufficient… more »

Caley (M.B.A. ’86, J.D. ’89) Receives Patton Community Service and Social Justice Award

An advocate for children with health care needs in low-income families, Sylvia B. Caley (M.B.A ’86; J.D. ’89), associate clinical professor of law, has left an indelible mark on the community in her quest to eliminate health disparities and promote health equity.

She will be honored on April 25 for her… more »

Maybe Scalia’s Seat Should Stay Empty for a While

In my March 7 Salon piece, I argued that a constitutional crisis over the vacant seat left by Justice Antonin Scalia might actually be a good thing for the Supreme Court and the country. A prolonged political war over the next justice might display starkly the politicized nature of the Court… more »

Texas’s Sham Abortion Laws

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in an historic abortion case, Whole Woman’s Health v. Cole, involving two Texas laws that, if upheld, will make it much more difficult for poor women in Texas to obtain abortions. The death of Justice Scalia has little effect on the outcome of this case. There are… more »

Students: Putting Skills into Practice “Powerful and Important”

“This has been enlightening for me,” said Mike Williford (J.D. ’17). “You sit in class and learn the black letter law, you learn what is supposed to happen in contracts, or criminal law or whatever, and then to be exposed to how that functions in the real world is eye-opening. It’s not always as clean… more »