Todres Discusses Human Rights in Children’s Literature on City Lights

“A person is a person, no matter how small.” This classic quote from Dr. Suess’ Horton Hears a Who is what inspired Professor Jonathan Todres to write a book about the human rights lessons one can learn from children’s books.

On Sept. 28, Todres was a guest on WABE’s “City Lights,”… more »

Nonpartisan Panel to Discuss Georgia’s Amendment 1 on Monday, Oct. 10

Georgia State Law is hosting a nonpartisan panel discussion Monday, Oct. 10, on Amendment 1, a state constitutional amendment before Georgia voters this November to approve or reject a proposed statewide Opportunity School District (OSD).

The panel will be held at noon, Monday, Oct. 10, in Room 242 of 85 Park Place N.E. State Rep. Valencia Stovall… more »

Segall: Alexander Hamilton and the New Supreme Court Term

As the Supreme Court’s new term begins, many court watchers have observed that the justices don’t have the usual front-page, nationally important cases on their docket.

By this time a year ago, the Supreme Court had already decided to hear controversial affirmative action, free speech and redistricting cases. Soon thereafter the… more »

Carolyn Lambert

CNCR’s Lambert Helps Compile Restorative Justice Database

Carolyn Lambert, director of programs for the Consortium on Negotiation and Conflict Resolution, along with Shannon Sliva, assistant professor of social work at the University of Denver, published a compilation of state statutes referencing restorative justice from the U.S. Restorative Justice Legislation Database on the National Association of Community and Restorative Justice’s website.

… more »

Segall: Why We Don’t Need a Ninth Supreme Court Justice

Posted On September 16, 2016 by Eric Segall, Kathy & Lawrence Ashe Professor of Law

The hand-wringers are wrong—an evenly split Supreme Court would end a narrow majority imposing its out-of-step will and would be good for the country.

When the U.S. Supreme Court begins its 2016-17 term in October, the biggest story will not involve a blockbuster case but the still empty seat created by Justice Antonin Scalia’s death… more »

Eskridge: Gay Marriage ‘A Long Struggle’ in Lead-Up to Obergefell

Julie Goodrige. Jack Baker. Edie Winsdor. Mike McDonnell. April Deboeur. Jayne Rowse. Few recognize these names. They are just a few of the people whose actions led to last year’s landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision Obergefell v. Hodges, which struck down bans on same-sex marriage nationwide.

William Eskridge Jr., the John A. Garver… more »

William Eskridge

Eskridge Discusses Marriage Equality at Sept. 15 Miller Lecture

William Eskridge, the Garver Professor of Jurisprudence at the Yale Law School, discussed “The Story Behind the Marriage Equality Decision — and What is Next for America” in the 58th Henry J. Miller Distinguished Lecture Thursday, Sept. 15, in the Marjorie and Ralph Knowles Conference Center at Georgia State University… more »

Kinkopf Testifies Before House Judiciary Committee Subcommittee

Professor Neil Kinkopf testified Sept. 7 before the U.S. House Judiciary Committee Subcommittee on the Constitution and Civil Justice about the legalities and oversight of the Judgment Fund.

“The Judgment Fund fulfills a fundamentally important duty of the federal government — to provide an effective remedy when the rights of individuals are violated,” Kinkopf said.

… more »