Experiential Learning – College of Law http://law.gsu.edu Public law school in Atlanta GA Fri, 18 Aug 2017 20:36:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://aeadmin1.gsu.edu/?v=4.6.1 http://law.gsu.edu/community/students/student-organizations/218968-2/ Fri, 18 Aug 2017 18:54:27 +0000 http://law.gsu.edu/?page_id=218968 Organization Office Officers Mindfulness in Law Society Mission:

To improve the mental health and well-being of Georgia State Law students through mindful practice. Mindful practice in this context includes secular meditation and mindfulness in all of its forms, and specifically mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) meditation techniques and yoga.

441… more »

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Organization Office Officers

Mindfulness in Law Society

Mission:

To improve the mental health and well-being of Georgia State Law students through mindful practice. Mindful practice in this context includes secular meditation and mindfulness in all of its forms, and specifically mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) meditation techniques and yoga.

441
President Christopher Kanelos
ckanelos1@student.gsu.edu
Vice President Alex Hegner
ahegner1@student.gsu.edu
Treasurer Sam Briggs
sbriggs6@student.gsu.edu
Secretary Danielle Pollack
dpollack2@student.gsu.edu

 

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Students Reunite Brides and Bridesmaids with Dresses After Chain Goes Bankrupt http://law.gsu.edu/2017/08/15/students-reunite-brides-and-bridesmaids-with-dresses-after-bridal-chain-goes-bankrupt/ Tue, 15 Aug 2017 20:22:50 +0000 http://law.gsu.edu/?p=218467 Saying “yes to the dress,” is one of the most memorable and exciting parts of wedding planning. However, when the bridal chain Alfred Angelo abruptly closed its 60 stores after filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in July, thousands of brides panicked. Managers posted “Store Closed” signs and listed bankruptcy lawyer Patricia Ann Redmond’s email… more »

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Jessica Gabel Cino and bankruptcy students

Associate Dean Jessica Gabel Cino (left) and her bankruptcy students helped find one bride’s missing dress then boxed it up for her to take home so her fiancé won’t see it.

Saying “yes to the dress,” is one of the most memorable and exciting parts of wedding planning. However, when the bridal chain Alfred Angelo abruptly closed its 60 stores after filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in July, thousands of brides panicked. Managers posted “Store Closed” signs and listed bankruptcy lawyer Patricia Ann Redmond’s email address to contact with questions.

Relief followed for several local brides and bridesmaids when Georgia State Law students and Jessica Cino, associate dean for academic affairs and associate professor of law, opened the Alfred Angelo in Dunwoody, Aug. 12, and distributed items the women had ordered for their big day.

Redmond, a business restructuring shareholder of Stearns Weaver Miller Weissler Alhadeff & Sitterson PA, was Cino’s bankruptcy professor and mentor at University of Miami School of Law. She contacted the associate dean for help.

“Trish is trying to help brides around the country get their dresses and other bridal items. The Atlanta store needed help because employees left the day the store closed without getting purchased orders to customers,” Cino said. “My husband and I went into the store, took inventory of everything we could find, and then matched it up to invoices so that Trish and her team could contact the brides and bridesmaids.”

Saturday, Aug. 12

Cino and her husband, Ryan, were able to match orders to nearly 30 people. From 10 a.m. to noon, they and eight students opened the store to distribute the items to brides and bridesmaids lined up outside.

Tiffany Clark drove from Birmingham, Ala., with her mother to pick up her dress. Her wedding is Friday, Oct. 13, and she learned of Alfred Angelo’s closing two weeks after her wedding venue burned down.

“I expected a bit of bad luck, given the wedding date, but nothing like this,” Clark said. “We were scrambling to find a new location when I learned I may not have a dress that we’d already paid for.”

Clark is hopeful the worst is behind her. She and her mother were incredibly thankful that Cino and the students volunteered to help.

“It’s amazing. I’m grateful for every person here. I really am,” Clark said.

Her mother added through tears, “It feels great. I’m relieved.”

Jason Drouyor (J.D. ’18) was stationed at the door, checking IDs and cross-referencing names with the list of who the bankruptcy team contacted. He observed the look of worry and frustration many had before entering the store.

“They received an email letting them know they had merchandise at the store, but they don’t know what’s here. It could be their dress or just a veil,” he said. “When they leave with their dresses, they are so happy.”

As a relative of a bride left the store, she touched Drouyor on the arm and said, “Bless you.”

“I wasn’t expecting to be a part of something like this when I agreed to volunteer,” he said. “It’s really amazing and an awesome opportunity for us as students to see what happens during a bankruptcy filing and how to make the best of a bad situation.”

Stephanie Songaila (J.D. ’18) volunteered because she genuinely felt bad for these women and wanted to help.

“The brides and bridesmaids spent time picking out their dresses and paid for them. Then, they were stuck with no recourse,” she said. “Everyone who came to the store Saturday was so appreciative. It was great to be able to help them after such a stressful event.”

Finding Missing Dress

Students when above and beyond to help Kia Midy, whose wedding is Nov. 11. She was hoping to pick up her dress, but the only item at the store was a dress accessory she ordered. Her father and fiancé waited outside, feeling a bit frantic.

“She visited the store five times and finally found the perfect dress, which we paid for,” Midy’s father said. “I heard about the store closing on the news, and we were incredibly disappointed. Kia was in tears, and my wife was so stressed that she got sick. I don’t know what we’ll do if they don’t have a dress for her.”

The students sprang into action to help Midy. She had a picture of the dress on her phone, so they scoured the racks to find a dress like the one she initially said yes to – and they did. Upon hearing the news, Midy’s father felt relieved and thankful.

“I applaud [the students and Cino] for doing this. With bankruptcies, there’s not much you can do, but they’re going out of their way to help us, and they don’t have to,” he said. “I don’t know what would happen if they weren’t here. Kudos to them.”

Learning Experience

Cino invited students to volunteer, knowing it would be a valuable learning experience.

“When you’re the lawyer, sometimes you need to do more than just legal work. Matching dresses to receipts doesn’t seem like legal work to most, but it’s work that matters to the brides and bridesmaids who need their items,” Cino said. “This is a good opportunity to step up and help people who really don’t have much recourse. Even if they somehow got money back from the bankruptcy – never a guarantee – what they really need is a dress, veil, etc. We’re not getting paid to do this, but it’s the right thing to do.”

Midy didn’t want her fiancé to see the dress, so the team packed it up in a box and carried it out the door. The expression on the father-of-the-bride’s face as he followed the students to his car captured the sentiment of the day. Worry turned to relief, and he grinned from ear-to-ear.

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Investor Advocacy Clinic, Secretary of State Office Develop Valuable Resources about Robo-Advisers http://law.gsu.edu/2017/08/10/investor-advocacy-clinic-secretary-state-office-develop-valuable-resources-robo-advisers/ Thu, 10 Aug 2017 19:52:05 +0000 http://law.gsu.edu/?p=217973 Through its partnership with the Securities Division of the Office of the Secretary of State, Georgia State Law’s Investor Advocacy Clinic (IAC) enhanced investor education with students tackling a cutting-edge technology issue that impacts the security industry – robo-advisers – and creating a resource library.

The securities division partnered with the North American Securities Administrators… more »

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robo-advisers and the Investor Advocacy Clinic

Through its partnership with the Securities Division of the Office of the Secretary of State, Georgia State Law’s Investor Advocacy Clinic (IAC) enhanced investor education with students tackling a cutting-edge technology issue that impacts the security industry – robo-advisers – and creating a resource library.

Through its partnership with the Securities Division of the Office of the Secretary of State, Georgia State Law’s Investor Advocacy Clinic (IAC) enhanced investor education with students tackling a cutting-edge technology issue that impacts the security industry – robo-advisers – and creating a resource library.

The securities division partnered with the North American Securities Administrators Association (NASAA) to learn more about these tools, and the clinic played a critical role in evaluating the pros and cons of robo-advising. Under the direction of Nicole G. Iannarone, assistant clinical professor and clinic director, students compiled and analyzed information relating to robo-advisers, which are investment management programs that select and manage individual portfolios.

Robo-advisers, previously called “internet advisers,” have changed significantly since they were introduced approximately 15 years ago. The products have gained in popularity in recent years, but there is relatively little educational and impartial information available. The algorithm-driven digital tools provide investment advisory services to consumers, often without any human interaction.

“Several legal questions arise as potential investors, financial advisers and regulators learn how to navigate this shift in financial investing through robo-advisers. Since the human interaction is diminished, the duties held by the investor and adviser are not as clear,” said Noula Zaharis, director of the Securities & Charities Division. “Legal questions, specifically about fiduciary duty, will continue to arise as robo-advisers become more prevalent.”

Qudsia Shafiq (J.D. ’18) and Majda Muhic (J.D. ’17) worked with the securities division and handled investigatory matters.

“Through general research, Majda and I determined the different business models under which robo-advisers operate and how they function within the financial industry,” Shafiq said. “We also identified key players and looked for potentially problematic regulatory issues and any arguments proposing robo-advisers as fulfilling – or failing to fulfill – their fiduciary duty to their clients.”

Based on their research findings, Shafiq and Muhic co-wrote a series of 11 articles for the IAC blog to help consumers understand what robo-advisers are, explain the fiduciary duty robo-advisers owe their clients and highlight the benefits, downfalls and key considerations for using this type of financial product.

“The available educational information comes in two forms: regulatory guidance, which is helpful but not published regularly, or white papers, which may be challenging for most investors to access or understand due to the complexity of the material and use of industry jargon,” Shafiq said. “The IAC approached these problems with one goal in mind: to educate investors so they can decide for themselves whether this product might be right for them. We don’t promote or endorse any products, and our main objective is to ensure investors are protected, educated and aware of the fiduciary duty robo-advisers owe them.”

“We are so thankful to the IAC and Georgia State Law students for developing such valuable resources. We know that our constituents will greatly benefit from these materials, and we have already received tremendous feedback from our partners at NASAA and state counterparts,” said Candice Broce (J.D. ’14), press secretary for the Office of Georgia Secretary of State. “We anticipate other regulators will use what the students put together and continue this important conversation on the growing practice of robo-advising in the United States.”

Muhic, who joined the clinic to further develop her lawyering skills and directly impact the lives of clients, found her experience working on the project rewarding.

“I gained valuable practical experience, developed relationships with clients and colleagues, and became more comfortable in my own role as an advocate and lawyer,” she said. “It felt satisfying to develop materials that will educate investors on this complex issue and hopefully inform their decisions to protect their investments. Overall, it was great to be a part of the IAC, which provides a platform for investors who may otherwise remain without recourse to recoup their losses and gives them a voice in the legal system.”

Shafiq agrees, “Nothing mimics the real world like seeing a case through to the end, and through the IAC, I was able to do that.”

“Investor education is a critical part of how we serve Georgians, and we are constantly searching for ways to guide members of the public in this complex legal landscape,” Zaharis said. “With this partnership, we are able to better accomplish our goals for investor education and assist our constituents in our day-to-day operations.”

Iannarone said the partnership has exceeded expectations.

“So far, the partnership has allowed each of our students to investigate an allegation of securities misconduct through the regulators’ eyes,” Iannarone said. “On top of that, they develop cutting-edge educational materials with a broader reach than the clinic can attain on its own. As we move forward, we anticipate expanding the partnership’s portfolio of innovative and engaging investor education pieces.”

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Gordon (J.D./M.Tx ’17) Putting Passion Into Practice http://law.gsu.edu/2017/06/29/gordon-j-d-m-tx-17-putting-passion-practice/ Thu, 29 Jun 2017 13:15:36 +0000 http://law.gsu.edu/?p=211162 “When you’re passionate about what you do, burning the midnight oil and putting in long hours that often stretch into evenings and over weekends doesn’t feel like ‘work,’— it’s just an investment you hope you’ll get a return on,” said Meghan R. Gordon (J.D./M.Tx ’17).

Gordon’s passion for real estate and the breadth of… more »

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Meghan R. Gordon (J.D./M.Tx' 17)

Meghan R. Gordon (J.D./M.Tx ’17) was awarded the CREW (Commercial Real Estate Women) Atlanta chapter’s 2017 Diane Cox Scholarship.

“When you’re passionate about what you do, burning the midnight oil and putting in long hours that often stretch into evenings and over weekends doesn’t feel like ‘work,’— it’s just an investment you hope you’ll get a return on,” said Meghan R. Gordon (J.D./M.Tx ’17).

Gordon’s passion for real estate and the breadth of the industry led her to pursue not only a J.D., but also a certificate in Land Use Law and a master’s in tax. She did this while clerking in the real estate practice of DLA Piper LLP and participating in extracurricular activities. Gordon served in the Philip C. Cook Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic, on the Moot Court Board and as vice president of the Association of Women Law Students. In addition, she was a graduate research assistant to Professor Ryan Rowberry.

Her involvement and dedication made an impression, as the CREW (Commercial Real Estate Women) Atlanta chapter awarded her with its 2017 Diane Cox Scholarship, which is given each year to a graduate student who excels in commercial real estate.

“We are thrilled that Meghan was chosen for this scholarship,” said Jessica Gabel Cino, associate dean for academic affairs and associate professor of law. “The honor is truly a testament to her hard work, passion, and talents.”

Gordon said she enjoys “everything” about real estate. “It’s fascinating to me to understand all the things a building can be or has been, and to then see how tied development is to public input and the traditional notions of notice and comment we study in our law classes – the union of those two things can be a real catalyst for equity and conscious growth,” she said.

Receiving the CREW scholarship, which also includes a yearlong membership to the invitation-only organization, is an honor, Gordon said. Accepting the award at the CREW gala April 27 felt like the convergence of the past three years of hard work while in law school, she said.

“To be giving a speech in front of all these accomplished women that I revere, and whose bios I have studied a number of times in the hopes of being them when I grow up, all the while maintaining composure and eloquence—due in large part to two years of participating in moot court!” she said. “To know I was there because of all the things I have poured myself into over the last few years —it was a great moment. It felt like I had finally arrived.”

Gordon’s choice to maintain a presence on campus was in part influenced by many of the faculty, alumni and guest speakers in her law classes. They encouraged students to make the most of law school by being involved, Gordon said, and fostered a supportive environment as well as a pipeline to alumni in her field whom she could consult on a collegial level.

“I am forever grateful for having meaningful interactions with faculty who knew my name, who knew what I was pursuing, knew what moot court competitions I was in, could point me to a means of obtaining a finance and tax understanding that is so critical to the industry – those small communal factors that are inherent to how Georgia State Law nurtures young lawyers are critical to success,” Gordon said. “Further, having a dean who also knew my name and would engage in conversations with me about my activities in the elevator — I don’t think you find that at many law schools.”

Georgia State does an outstanding job of ensuring nontradition students can be successful while enabling them to define what that success looks like, Gordon said.

“For me, success was always greater than my numerical reduction to a GPA,” she said. “Success was also making a concerted effort to dedicate three years to seize on all the opportunities I was fortunate enough to receive, and be certain that when I walked across the stage at graduation I knew definitively where I wanted to be in legal field — and how I was going to get there.”

Working while a full-time student provided Gordon a unique perspective on service to the industry, especially with respect to her work in the tax clinic, where she could immediately put advocacy into practice.

“At the firm, I reported to partners and associates on deals that were millions of dollars in scope, meanwhile I was also tasked with running point on cases and being the client contact for my nonpaying clinic clients with a few thousand dollars in controversy,” Gordon said. “To be on both ends of spectrum like that not only kept me grounded, but ensured that when I was client-facing and the stakes were higher in sum, I felt more like a seasoned associate than a deer caught in headlights.”

These experiences helped her understand what expectations would be once she graduated, and gave her tools to become the type of lawyer she wants to be, Gordon said.

“I think the best lawyer I can be is a compassionate one who will continue to fight for the interests of the economically disadvantaged, while leveraging my real estate experience and this wonderful new network I have in the women of CREW to get to work on meaningfully contributing to the legal field,” she said.

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Exhibit On Georgia State Campus Allows Public To Explore Issues Of Health Equity In America http://law.gsu.edu/2017/06/12/exhibit-health-equity-america/ Mon, 12 Jun 2017 13:20:34 +0000 http://law.gsu.edu/2017/06/12/exhibit-health-equity-america/ ATLANTA—Georgia State University is re-mounting portions of the exhibit “Health is a Human Right: Race and Place in America,” making materials originally displayed at the David J. Sencer CDC Museum available to the public for the first time since 2014.

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ATLANTA—Georgia State University is re-mounting portions of the exhibit “Health is a Human Right: Race and Place in America,” making materials originally displayed at the David J. Sencer CDC Museum available to the public for the first time since 2014.

Exhibit in Person

  • College of Law, Research Centers and Institutes, Fourth Floor, 85 Park Place NE, Atlanta, 30303
  • Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday

The exhibit, which includes historic photos, posters and other documents, is free and open to the public on weekdays from June 12 through Dec. 1 at the university’s College of Law, 85 Park Place NE, Atlanta.

Kim R. Ramsey-White, director of undergraduate programs at the School of Public Health, recalls taking a group of students in her undergraduate course “Health Disparities and the Public’s Health” to see the original exhibit before it closed in spring 2014.

“As the students circulated through the exhibit, the excitement of seeing what they were learning in class presented in the exhibit resulted in an infectious engagement that lasted for weeks,” White said. “Having this exhibit as a resource on our campus will allow faculty to connect students to powerful visual and narrative content that humanizes the history of racism, discrimination and marginalization and their individual and collective impact on the health of our nation. We are proud to revive the exhibit in a way that will engage, educate and reinforce for generations that ‘Health is Human Right.’”

The freshly curated exhibit is the result of a partnership among the School of Public Health, the Center for Law, Health & Society and the University Library, which has produced an interactive, online version of the exhibit that includes additional materials and allows for distance learning opportunities.

“This exhibit has rich components that align with the curriculum in health law and several other law courses,” said Stacie Kershner, associate director of the Center for Law, Health & Society. “It complements the center’s mission of providing a space for reflection on critical issues at the intersection of law, policy, health and society. We are excited for this opportunity to continue our collaboration across campus, and to welcome visitors into the College of Law’s new building for this thought-provoking experience.”

Attendees of the 40th annual Health Law Professors Conference held at the College of Law received a sneak peek of the exhibit in early June. The conference, co-sponsored by the Center for Law, Health & Society and the American Society of Law Medicine and & Ethics, focused on the theme of health equity and the use of law to address the social determinants of health, which closely aligned with the exhibit’s focus.

For more information, or to schedule a class visit after business hours, go to the exhibit website: publichealth.gsu.edu/health-exhibit/

To visit the interactive online exhibit, go to: library.gsu.edu/healthexhibit

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Georgia State Law Introduces LL.M. with Concentration in Health Law http://law.gsu.edu/2017/06/01/georgia-state-law-introduces-ll-m-concentration-health-law/ Thu, 01 Jun 2017 16:18:37 +0000 http://law.gsu.edu/?p=210797 Georgia State University College of Law is introducing a master of laws with a concentration in health law through its Center for Law, Health & Society, beginning this fall. This program builds on the center’s successful and popular health law certificate for J.D. students.

“Health law touches so many different fields and careers,” said more »

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LL.M. with a concentration in Health Law

The Center for Law, Health & Society at Georgia State University College of Law is introducing a master of laws with a concentration in health law, beginning this fall.

Georgia State University College of Law is introducing a master of laws with a concentration in health law through its Center for Law, Health & Society, beginning this fall. This program builds on the center’s successful and popular health law certificate for J.D. students.

“Health law touches so many different fields and careers,” said Stacie Kershner (J.D. ’08), center associate director. “I receive many calls from our graduates and other attorneys interested in learning more about health law. We want to meet these needs, and our ability to offer both full-time and part-time options makes us uniquely capable of doing so.”

The LL.M. with a concentration in health law takes advantage of the depth and breadth of the center’s faculty expertise as well as one of the top-rated health law programs in the country. The Georgia State Law program has been consistently ranked in the top 10 programs by U.S. News & World Report over the last decade.

The program is designed to prepare attorneys for practice or policy work in health law through exposure to the foundations and key concepts, laws, policies, institutions, skills and values in the field. Required and elective courses enrich attorneys’ understanding of how law plays a pivotal role in ensuring health and in addressing critical issues of access, cost and quality in health care.

Attorneys who are transitioning to health law from another area of law, as well as those who want to take advantage of Georgia State Law’s expertise and deepen their knowledge of a particular area to enhance their existing practice or career, can benefit from the program.

“We have 12 full-time faculty and additional affiliated and adjunct faculty who offer courses across a range of health law topics,” said Leslie Wolf, center director and professor of law. “This allows us to meet the needs of students who come with different experiences and different interests in health law. Health law continues to be an important growth area, and we are excited to serve the needs of a new group of students.”

To learn more about the LL.M. with a concentration in health law, visit clhs.law.gsu.edu/llm_healthlaw. To apply for the program, visit llm.lsac.org/LOGIN/Access.aspx.

For additional questions about the program, contact Kershner at lawandhealth@gsu.edu or 404-413-9088.

 

 

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Kerew Honored for Teaching Excellence With Maleski Award http://law.gsu.edu/2017/05/30/kerew-honored-teaching-excellence-maleski-award/ Tue, 30 May 2017 15:45:40 +0000 http://law.gsu.edu/?p=210762 Kendall L. Kerew, clinical assistant professor and Externship Program director, received the David J. Maleski Award for Teaching Excellence for her innovation in developing and teaching the Externship Seminar, which integrates experiential learning with professional identity formation.

“Professor Kerew’s groundbreaking work on professional identity formation in the Externship Course has received rave reviews from students… more »

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Kendall Kerew

Kendall Kerew, assistant clinical professor and Externship Program director, received the 2017 Maleski Award.

Kendall L. Kerew, clinical assistant professor and Externship Program director, received the David J. Maleski Award for Teaching Excellence for her innovation in developing and teaching the Externship Seminar, which integrates experiential learning with professional identity formation.

“Professor Kerew’s groundbreaking work on professional identity formation in the Externship Course has received rave reviews from students and from faculty across the country,” said Andrea Curcio, professor of law.

Kerew launched the required one-credit hour seminar in fall 2015 after an extensive development process. “Because there was not a model for what I wanted to do, I had to research a wide variety of materials from legal education and other disciplines,” she said.

It was important to develop a course students would find valuable while also supplementing their externship experience in the field, Kerew said. In the seminar, students’ externship experiences provide a springboard for class discussion and self-exploration.

“The seminar facilitates an understanding and deliberate exploration of each student’s professional identity as a future lawyer,” Kerew said. “The course design was shaped by the concept of lawyer as leader and the essential competencies of the profession. It develops students’ self-awareness as to both strengths and areas for growth in an effort to facilitate self-directed lifelong learning .”

Making a difference in the professional development of future lawyers is rewarding, Kerew said.

“Through the class, I get to know students personally and professionally, and have the opportunity to really help them figure out who they want to be as a lawyer so they are happy and successful in future practice,” she said.

Kerew has presented and shared materials on the Externship Seminar design and teaching methodologies both regionally and nationally.

“We have amazing teachers on our faculty so to receive a teaching excellence award from this faculty is truly flattering,” Kerew said.

“I am especially appreciative of Andi Curio who was enthusiastic about my idea and gave me feedback, even sitting in as a student in the pilot course,” Kerew said. “I am also thankful to Kinda Abdus-Saboor, who co-teaches the seminar and has provided important insights and ideas that have helped shape and fine-tune the seminar.”

 

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Wolf Receives Inaugural Kaminshine Award for Service http://law.gsu.edu/2017/05/30/wolf-receives-inaugural-kaminshine-award-service/ Tue, 30 May 2017 14:10:37 +0000 http://law.gsu.edu/?p=210759 Leslie E. Wolf, director of the Center for Law, Health & Society and professor of law, received the inaugural Steven J. Kaminshine Award for Excellence in Service at the May faculty meeting.

“The College of Law has a tradition of substantial faculty involvement in service activities, and we wanted… more »

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Leslie E. Wolf, director of the Center for Law, Health & Society and professor of law, received the inaugural Steven J. Kaminshine Award for Excellence in Service at the May faculty meeting.

Leslie Wolf

Leslie Wolf, professor of law and director of the Center for Law, Health & Society, received the inaugural Steven J. Kaminshine Award for Excellence in Service.

“The College of Law has a tradition of substantial faculty involvement in service activities, and we wanted to begin recognizing service just as we recognize exceptional scholarship and teaching,” said Wendy Hensel, incoming interim dean and professor of law. “The title of the award was conceived by the Faculty Development Committee to recognize the exceptional service that Steve has provided to the college over the last 12 years.”

The award will be given each spring to a full-time faculty member who, within the previous two calendar years, has compiled a substantial and continuing record of outstanding service.

“There is no one more deserving of this award than Leslie. She is involved in virtually every major initiative at the college and selflessly devotes her time and energy to serve students, faculty, and the college of law,” Hensel said.

“Leslie Wolf gives her all to the College of Law,” said Jessica Gabel Cino, associate dean of academic affairs. “As the inaugural recipient of the award, she embodies the countless hours of service she dedicates to our students, our mission, and the Georgia State Law community at large. I am not sure where she gets all that energy from, but it seems to be infinite.”

For Wolf, serving is central to her work. “I have been extremely fortunate to have had excellent mentors throughout my career from whom I learned the importance of service,” she said. “They generously dedicated time to my and others’ development and also served their various communities in a variety of ways. Following in their footsteps, I learned how essential, but also how rewarding, service can be.”

Within the College of Law, Wolf serves on the Dean’s Advisory Committee and on the Promotion & Tenure Committee. She also serves as the Georgia State representative for the Health Law Partnership (HeLP), its Advisory Council, and the HeLP Foundation Board.

In addition, she often plays a significant role in projects outside her day to day work as director of CLHS, including helping to develop the Fall 2016 Law Review Symposium,  Quinlan at 40 – Exploring the Right to Die in the U.S.” She was instrumental in bringing the national ASLME 40th Annual Health Law Professors Conference, which the center is co-sponsor, to the College of Law in June. This is the first time this event will be held in the Southeast. In addition to planning the multiday event, Wolf got commitments from law firms and a local hospital to sponsor the event.

Wolf also devotes many hours of service to the university. She is a member of the Senate Research Committee, where she has also served on the Board of the Georgia State University Research Foundation and was appointed as the educational liaison to the Human Research Protection Program. In 2015, she was asked to serve on the university’s Strategic Planning Update Committee and in 2016-17, she served on the Next Generation Proposal Review Committee, providing advice to the provost and the associate provost for strategic initiatives and innovation on submitted proposals.

“I am honored to be the inaugural recipient of the Steven J. Kaminshine Award for Excellence in Service. Having worked closely with Steve in recent years on several projects, including the development of new educational programs, and had his steadfast support since I arrived at Georgia State Law, it is particularly meaningful to me to receive this award,” Wolf said.

To many, Wolf is also an informal advisor and mentor. She advises colleagues seeking to introduce new centers and new certificate programs, and those who are interested in conducting empirical research. She works closely with students who have served as GRAs. “We seek to provide these students with meaningful experiences, while advancing the goals of the research,” she said.

During the past two years, Wolf led efforts to grow the health law program, including offering an online masters of jurisprudence (MJ) program, an LLM degree and a post-JD certificate in health law.

Wolf’s service extends beyond the college and university, as she has served on several national committees, including a National Institute of Health scientific review panel and a Department of Defense review panel. In December, she was appointed to the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections in the Department of Health and Human Services. She also is an ad hoc reviewer for a variety of peer-reviewed medical and ethics journals.

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Investor Advocacy Clinic Helps Shape Regulations Via Comment Letters http://law.gsu.edu/2017/04/05/investor-advocacy-clinic-helps-shape-regulations-via-comment-letters/ Wed, 05 Apr 2017 23:05:29 +0000 http://law.gsu.edu/?p=208213 When the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) considers adopting a rule — or amending an existing one — that will govern an aspect of the relationship between brokers and investors or their employers, it solicits comments from practitioners and the public.

As part of its mission of serving regular investors, Georgia State Law’s more »

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Michael Williford (J.D. '17)

Clinic intern Michael Williford (J.D. ’17) (on left) drafted a comment on FINRA SR-2016-029, a proposal requiring all parties represented in a FINRA proceeding to use FINRA’s electronic Party Portal to “file initial statements of claim and to file and serve pleadings and other documents on FINRA or any other party” and “to file and serve correspondence relating to discovery requests” as opposed to filing paper copies.

When the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) considers adopting a rule — or amending an existing one — that will govern an aspect of the relationship between brokers and investors or their employers, it solicits comments from practitioners and the public.

As part of its mission of serving regular investors, Georgia State Law’s Investor Advocacy Clinic regularly evaluates FINRA rule proposals and submits comments. Clinic students primarily draft the comments under the direction of Nicole G. Iannarone, assistant clinical professor and clinic director. The comments, which are publicly available in the Federal Register, help FINRA assess whether adopting the new rule is in the best interests of its members and the investing public.

“The IAC submits comments on rules that will affect our clients, who are often retirees on fixed incomes,” Iannarone said. “The comment letter procedure allows the clinic to speak directly to the organization whose leaders make decisions that can impact the clients we serve.  In the process, students to develop a deeper understanding of how regulations are developed.”

Clinic intern Michael Williford (J.D. ’17) drafted a comment on FINRA SR-2016-029, a proposal requiring all parties represented in a FINRA proceeding to use FINRA’s electronic Party Portal to “file initial statements of claim and to file and serve pleadings and other documents on FINRA or any other party” and “to file and serve correspondence relating to discovery requests” as opposed to filing paper copies.

The comment praised FINRA for taking steps to increase access and efficiency and identified two potential problems—outlining recommendations to correct each. The clinic noted that claimants in smaller cases may not be able to remit payment for filing fees electronically and the requirement may result in lawyers turning down smaller cases—both resulting in more claimants attempting to file cases without representation or in valid claims going unfiled.

In the comment, the clinic proposed that proceedings where the claimant seeks damages less than $100,000 should be exempted from the electronic payment provisions. The clinic also identified concerns that the proposal did not require parties to protect the personal confidential information of claimants in simplified arbitration proceedings.

While parties in proceedings requesting more than $50,000 in damages must redact information that identity thieves could use, the redaction requirement had not been extended to “small” claims. The clinic reiterated its earlier comments on the redaction rule and noted the importance of redacting personal confidential information if a proceeding is filed electronically.

“As a result of our comment, I and other clinic students were fortunate enough to have a face-to-face meeting with some of the FINRA leaders,” Williford said. “They were receptive to our input and gracious. It was a rare opportunity, as a law student, to interact directly with policy makers and discuss an issue that could have real-world effects on the IAC’s clients.”

Ultimately FINRA decided to adopt the rule as originally proposed, but Williford considered the overall comment process rewarding.

“We weren’t successful convincing FINRA to adopt our proposals, but the comment process is about more than that,” he said. “Advocating for IAC clients through the comment process helps shape policy over the long run.

“Even if FINRA doesn’t make changes based on a particular comment letter, drafting the letters helps keep advocates for small investors in FINRA’s sights, so they are never too far from policy-makers minds,” Williford said.

Iannarone agrees that the comment letters help the clinic fulfill its mission of serving investors who otherwise do not have a voice.

“Because we serve those who do not have access to lawyers for their legal issues, participating in the comment letter process is especially important,” Iannarone said. “We ensure that the impact on small investors is considered in the rulemaking process because financial regulations affect them, often more so than industry or larger investors who are able to employ lawyers to represent their interests.”

In addition to comment letters, Williford considers his overall experience with the clinic incredibly worthwhile.

“The clinic is work. It’s not a free ride, but it is also incredibly rewarding to work with real clients who have real problems,” Williford said. “The IAC serves an important function by representing clients who have arguably been duped out of their retirement savings by less than scrupulous brokers.

“These are cases that are generally too small for the average practitioner to take on because the numbers just don’t add up,” Williford said. “Without the IAC, those investors would not have a voice in legal proceedings. That’s important.”

The IAC has filed dozens of comment letters, all of which are available on the Georgia State Law Center for Clinical Education blog.

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Spring 2017 Message from the Associate Dean of Experiential Education http://law.gsu.edu/2017/04/05/spring-2017-message-associate-dean-experiential-education/ Wed, 05 Apr 2017 22:47:11 +0000 http://law.gsu.edu/?p=208219 We are pleased to be included among the top 30 clinical programs among U.S. law schools in the U.S. News & World Report rankings for 2018. We have achieved this distinction in large part due to our extraordinary experiential programming, exemplified by our innovative clinics and externships, as well as our ongoing efforts… more »

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experiential fair

Students visit with the various clinics, clinical course and centers during the biannual experiential learning fair at Georgia State Law.

We are pleased to be included among the top 30 clinical programs among U.S. law schools in the U.S. News & World Report rankings for 2018. We have achieved this distinction in large part due to our extraordinary experiential programming, exemplified by our innovative clinics and externships, as well as our ongoing efforts to infuse experiential learning throughout the curriculum. In this newsletter, you will learn about our newest experiential courses and the professional engagement and service of our talented clinicians.

Lisa Radtke Bliss, associate dean for experiential education

Lisa Radtke Bliss, associate dean for experiential education

Law students who matriculated in fall 2016 are subject to the recently enacted ABA Standard 303, which requires each student complete one or more experiential courses totaling at least six credit hours. These students, who are in the second semester of their first year of law school, will soon be registering for their second-year courses.

They are considering the curricular opportunities we offer that will allow them to meet their professional goals and to satisfy the experiential course requirement of the ABA Standards. Each semester, Georgia State Law has an Experiential Course Fair, as well as other events, including panels with practicing lawyers, to help students assess their experiential course choices and to navigate the curriculum according to their specific interests.
This year, these events received more student attention than ever. This speaks to students’ excitement for experiential opportunities, which allow them to explore what lawyers do and how they see themselves within the profession. Through our experiential courses, the activities and experiences students may include the following:

  • working for a judge
  • representing a client in an administrative hearing
  • drafting proposed legislation and following it through the legislative process
  • representing a client in a protective order hearing
  • negotiating a settlement on behalf of a client and drafting settlement documents
  • becoming certified as a mediator and mediating cases between two parties
  • engaging in advocacy on behalf of persons with a disability
  • drafting briefs on behalf of persons who are incarcerated
  • representing clients in criminal proceedings
  • becoming immersed in legal work for nonprofits and government agencies

These learning experiences help students develop critical skills, form positive relationships with others, and build their professional networks. We now have more than 22 different courses that qualify as experiential. These choices allow students to customize their law school experience in a way that best meets their goals and prepares them for future success.

 

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