Center for Law, Health & Society – College of Law http://law.gsu.edu Public law school in Atlanta GA Wed, 26 Jul 2017 18:59:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://aeadmin1.gsu.edu/?v=4.6.1 Exhibit On Georgia State Campus Allows Public To Explore Issues Of Health Equity In America http://law.gsu.edu/2017/06/12/exhibit-health-equity-america/ Mon, 12 Jun 2017 13:20:34 +0000 http://law.gsu.edu/2017/06/12/exhibit-health-equity-america/ ATLANTA—Georgia State University is re-mounting portions of the exhibit “Health is a Human Right: Race and Place in America,” making materials originally displayed at the David J. Sencer CDC Museum available to the public for the first time since 2014.

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ATLANTA—Georgia State University is re-mounting portions of the exhibit “Health is a Human Right: Race and Place in America,” making materials originally displayed at the David J. Sencer CDC Museum available to the public for the first time since 2014.

Exhibit in Person

  • College of Law, Research Centers and Institutes, Fourth Floor, 85 Park Place NE, Atlanta, 30303
  • Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday

The exhibit, which includes historic photos, posters and other documents, is free and open to the public on weekdays from June 12 through Dec. 1 at the university’s College of Law, 85 Park Place NE, Atlanta.

Kim R. Ramsey-White, director of undergraduate programs at the School of Public Health, recalls taking a group of students in her undergraduate course “Health Disparities and the Public’s Health” to see the original exhibit before it closed in spring 2014.

“As the students circulated through the exhibit, the excitement of seeing what they were learning in class presented in the exhibit resulted in an infectious engagement that lasted for weeks,” White said. “Having this exhibit as a resource on our campus will allow faculty to connect students to powerful visual and narrative content that humanizes the history of racism, discrimination and marginalization and their individual and collective impact on the health of our nation. We are proud to revive the exhibit in a way that will engage, educate and reinforce for generations that ‘Health is Human Right.’”

The freshly curated exhibit is the result of a partnership among the School of Public Health, the Center for Law, Health & Society and the University Library, which has produced an interactive, online version of the exhibit that includes additional materials and allows for distance learning opportunities.

“This exhibit has rich components that align with the curriculum in health law and several other law courses,” said Stacie Kershner, associate director of the Center for Law, Health & Society. “It complements the center’s mission of providing a space for reflection on critical issues at the intersection of law, policy, health and society. We are excited for this opportunity to continue our collaboration across campus, and to welcome visitors into the College of Law’s new building for this thought-provoking experience.”

Attendees of the 40th annual Health Law Professors Conference held at the College of Law received a sneak peek of the exhibit in early June. The conference, co-sponsored by the Center for Law, Health & Society and the American Society of Law Medicine and & Ethics, focused on the theme of health equity and the use of law to address the social determinants of health, which closely aligned with the exhibit’s focus.

For more information, or to schedule a class visit after business hours, go to the exhibit website: publichealth.gsu.edu/health-exhibit/

To visit the interactive online exhibit, go to: library.gsu.edu/healthexhibit

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Georgia State Law Introduces LL.M. with Concentration in Health Law http://law.gsu.edu/2017/06/01/georgia-state-law-introduces-ll-m-concentration-health-law/ Thu, 01 Jun 2017 16:18:37 +0000 http://law.gsu.edu/?p=210797 Georgia State University College of Law is introducing a master of laws with a concentration in health law through its Center for Law, Health & Society, beginning this fall. This program builds on the center’s successful and popular health law certificate for J.D. students.

“Health law touches so many different fields and careers,” said more »

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LL.M. with a concentration in Health Law

The Center for Law, Health & Society at Georgia State University College of Law is introducing a master of laws with a concentration in health law, beginning this fall.

Georgia State University College of Law is introducing a master of laws with a concentration in health law through its Center for Law, Health & Society, beginning this fall. This program builds on the center’s successful and popular health law certificate for J.D. students.

“Health law touches so many different fields and careers,” said Stacie Kershner (J.D. ’08), center associate director. “I receive many calls from our graduates and other attorneys interested in learning more about health law. We want to meet these needs, and our ability to offer both full-time and part-time options makes us uniquely capable of doing so.”

The LL.M. with a concentration in health law takes advantage of the depth and breadth of the center’s faculty expertise as well as one of the top-rated health law programs in the country. The Georgia State Law program has been consistently ranked in the top 10 programs by U.S. News & World Report over the last decade.

The program is designed to prepare attorneys for practice or policy work in health law through exposure to the foundations and key concepts, laws, policies, institutions, skills and values in the field. Required and elective courses enrich attorneys’ understanding of how law plays a pivotal role in ensuring health and in addressing critical issues of access, cost and quality in health care.

Attorneys who are transitioning to health law from another area of law, as well as those who want to take advantage of Georgia State Law’s expertise and deepen their knowledge of a particular area to enhance their existing practice or career, can benefit from the program.

“We have 12 full-time faculty and additional affiliated and adjunct faculty who offer courses across a range of health law topics,” said Leslie Wolf, center director and professor of law. “This allows us to meet the needs of students who come with different experiences and different interests in health law. Health law continues to be an important growth area, and we are excited to serve the needs of a new group of students.”

To learn more about the LL.M. with a concentration in health law, visit clhs.law.gsu.edu/llm_healthlaw. To apply for the program, visit llm.lsac.org/LOGIN/Access.aspx.

For additional questions about the program, contact Kershner at lawandhealth@gsu.edu or 404-413-9088.

 

 

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Wolf Receives Inaugural Kaminshine Award for Service http://law.gsu.edu/2017/05/30/wolf-receives-inaugural-kaminshine-award-service/ Tue, 30 May 2017 14:10:37 +0000 http://law.gsu.edu/?p=210759 Leslie E. Wolf, director of the Center for Law, Health & Society and professor of law, received the inaugural Steven J. Kaminshine Award for Excellence in Service at the May faculty meeting.

“The College of Law has a tradition of substantial faculty involvement in service activities, and we wanted… more »

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Leslie E. Wolf, director of the Center for Law, Health & Society and professor of law, received the inaugural Steven J. Kaminshine Award for Excellence in Service at the May faculty meeting.

Leslie Wolf

Leslie Wolf, professor of law and director of the Center for Law, Health & Society, received the inaugural Steven J. Kaminshine Award for Excellence in Service.

“The College of Law has a tradition of substantial faculty involvement in service activities, and we wanted to begin recognizing service just as we recognize exceptional scholarship and teaching,” said Wendy Hensel, incoming interim dean and professor of law. “The title of the award was conceived by the Faculty Development Committee to recognize the exceptional service that Steve has provided to the college over the last 12 years.”

The award will be given each spring to a full-time faculty member who, within the previous two calendar years, has compiled a substantial and continuing record of outstanding service.

“There is no one more deserving of this award than Leslie. She is involved in virtually every major initiative at the college and selflessly devotes her time and energy to serve students, faculty, and the college of law,” Hensel said.

“Leslie Wolf gives her all to the College of Law,” said Jessica Gabel Cino, associate dean of academic affairs. “As the inaugural recipient of the award, she embodies the countless hours of service she dedicates to our students, our mission, and the Georgia State Law community at large. I am not sure where she gets all that energy from, but it seems to be infinite.”

For Wolf, serving is central to her work. “I have been extremely fortunate to have had excellent mentors throughout my career from whom I learned the importance of service,” she said. “They generously dedicated time to my and others’ development and also served their various communities in a variety of ways. Following in their footsteps, I learned how essential, but also how rewarding, service can be.”

Within the College of Law, Wolf serves on the Dean’s Advisory Committee and on the Promotion & Tenure Committee. She also serves as the Georgia State representative for the Health Law Partnership (HeLP), its Advisory Council, and the HeLP Foundation Board.

In addition, she often plays a significant role in projects outside her day to day work as director of CLHS, including helping to develop the Fall 2016 Law Review Symposium,  Quinlan at 40 – Exploring the Right to Die in the U.S.” She was instrumental in bringing the national ASLME 40th Annual Health Law Professors Conference, which the center is co-sponsor, to the College of Law in June. This is the first time this event will be held in the Southeast. In addition to planning the multiday event, Wolf got commitments from law firms and a local hospital to sponsor the event.

Wolf also devotes many hours of service to the university. She is a member of the Senate Research Committee, where she has also served on the Board of the Georgia State University Research Foundation and was appointed as the educational liaison to the Human Research Protection Program. In 2015, she was asked to serve on the university’s Strategic Planning Update Committee and in 2016-17, she served on the Next Generation Proposal Review Committee, providing advice to the provost and the associate provost for strategic initiatives and innovation on submitted proposals.

“I am honored to be the inaugural recipient of the Steven J. Kaminshine Award for Excellence in Service. Having worked closely with Steve in recent years on several projects, including the development of new educational programs, and had his steadfast support since I arrived at Georgia State Law, it is particularly meaningful to me to receive this award,” Wolf said.

To many, Wolf is also an informal advisor and mentor. She advises colleagues seeking to introduce new centers and new certificate programs, and those who are interested in conducting empirical research. She works closely with students who have served as GRAs. “We seek to provide these students with meaningful experiences, while advancing the goals of the research,” she said.

During the past two years, Wolf led efforts to grow the health law program, including offering an online masters of jurisprudence (MJ) program, an LLM degree and a post-JD certificate in health law.

Wolf’s service extends beyond the college and university, as she has served on several national committees, including a National Institute of Health scientific review panel and a Department of Defense review panel. In December, she was appointed to the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections in the Department of Health and Human Services. She also is an ad hoc reviewer for a variety of peer-reviewed medical and ethics journals.

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Wolf Lectures on HIV Exposure Statutes at Johns Hopkins University http://law.gsu.edu/2017/02/07/wolf-lectures-hiv-exposure-statutes-johns-hopkins-university/ Wed, 08 Feb 2017 01:35:36 +0000 http://law.gsu.edu/?p=202464 Leslie Wolf, professor and director of the Center for Law, Health & Society, recently presented, “Reconciling Criminal HIV Exposure Statutes and Public Health, as part of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics Seminar Series. The presentation was based on Wolf’s research and teaching on this topic, including her… more »

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Leslie Wolf

Leslie Wolf, professor of law and director of the Center for Law, Health & Society

Leslie Wolf, professor and director of the Center for Law, Health & Society, recently presented, “Reconciling Criminal HIV Exposure Statutes and Public Health, as part of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics Seminar Series. The presentation was based on Wolf’s research and teaching on this topic, including her chapter in the book, Criminalising Contagion, published by Cambridge University Press in 2016.

States began adopting laws that criminalized exposure to HIV in 1986, after the HIV test became available, Wolf said. The laws typically require only that a person intend to engage the activity that risks transmission of HIV, rather than an intention to harm or actual transmission.

“They also typically do not account for measures that reduce transmission risk,” Wolf said. “Accordingly, they often criminalize no or low risk behavior. This can reinforce misunderstanding and fears about HIV when prosecutions are reported in the media.”

Although HIV exposure statutes have been criticized, politicians and the public continue to support them. Wolf suggested that a 2014 Iowa case and the revised statute Iowa adopted in its wake demonstrates a way forward. “While it falls short of what HIV and public health advocates wanted, the Iowa statute takes into account current prevention science, which is a significant improvement.

In addition to the noontime lecture, Wolf met with the Hecht-Levi Fellows in bioethics, during which she discussed her research on the “web” of legal protections for genomic research. Wolf was a Greenwall Fellow in Bioethics and Health Policy at Hopkins from 1996-1998 and earned her master’s in public health in 1997.

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Charles (J.D. ’18) Leads National Mindfulness Society’s Student Division http://law.gsu.edu/2017/01/10/charles-j-d-18-leads-national-mindfulness-societys-student-division/ Tue, 10 Jan 2017 15:45:13 +0000 http://law.gsu.edu/?p=198315 Austin Charles (J.D. ’18), with the help of his faculty advisor Charity Scott, the Catherine C. Henson Professor of Law, is the chair of the Mindfulness in Law Society student division and has taken the lead for developing mindfulness resources and networking among law students who desire to establish mindfulness programs at their… more »

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Austin Charles (J.D. '18) teaching a yoga class

Austin Charles (J.D. ’18) (center) leads the weekly yoga class for students, faculty and staff. The class is part of Georgia State Law’s mindfulness program.

Austin Charles (J.D. ’18), with the help of his faculty advisor Charity Scott, the Catherine C. Henson Professor of Law, is the chair of the Mindfulness in Law Society student division and has taken the lead for developing mindfulness resources and networking among law students who desire to establish mindfulness programs at their law schools.

Charity Scott

Charity Scott, Catherine Henson Professor of Law and founding director of the Center for Law, Health & Society

“Austin has put in an enormous amount of time and effort to launch the MILS student division,” Scott said. “He has established both an online databank of mindfulness resources and numerous personal connections with law students across the country to build mindfulness programs in law schools. He’s being looked to by law schools across the country to help with setting up these programs.”

The Mindfulness in Law Society (MILS) is a national organization designed to serve students, lawyers, law faculty members and judges. It aims to improve the mental well-being of legal professionals across the nation through mindfulness practices.

“At first, we thought it could be a good idea to find out what other schools were doing and learn from their programs,” Charles said. “As it turned out, we discovered that our program was one of the more active ones, so we decided to start connecting and networking these student groups so that we could help support one another and exchange ideas.”

Whether it’s assembling bylaws for new student organizations, directing prospective schools toward the MILS website for in-depth information, or giving advice on how to informally garner faculty and administrative support, Charles is connecting law students interested in developing their mindful practice and student organizations to these valuable resources.

A number of law schools have already signed up to join the MILS student division. Charles has benefitted from the experience of robust programs established at Miami Law and Missouri Law. The parent MILS organization is the brainchild of Missouri Law Professor Richard Reuben (J.D. ’85). Scott Rogers, lecturer in law and director of the Mindfulness in Law Program at University of Miami School of Law has published in the mindfulness field and spoke at Georgia State Law last year.

When Charles is not consulting with other law students about their interest levels and assessing their needs to build or build upon a program, he’s traveling to other schools or presenting at national conferences.

“A lot of what we’ve been working on are the relationships,” Charles said. “I went up to Columbia Law this fall and taught a mindfulness workshop for their students, and in turn, we’re having the student director of its program come instruct at one of our retreats.”

“I have been pleased that our faculty have reacted positively to establishing the mindfulness program for students at the College of Law,” Scott said. “The program benefits greatly from Dean [Steven J.] Kaminshine’s initial and enthusiastic support. He’s to be credited with taking the first step and allowing us to develop it.”

“From my personal experience talking to my professors about our student organization, the national society, and our yoga program, they’re happy we’re doing this,” Charles said. “Giving students the opportunity for more stress reduction is something that they get behind.”

While the College of Law has supported its mindfulness program, students elsewhere may face challenges from their faculty or administration.

“Faculty at other schools might say ‘this doesn’t have anything to do with academics, the students need to toughen up, this is going to slow students down’,” Scott said. “Mindfulness programs are relatively new in legal education. Some might not understand what the programs offer or be hesitant to embrace them until after they have learned more or seen the benefits of established programs.”
And that’s where Charles can help students at other law schools, as chair of the national MILS student division.

“The network of law schools we are creating is a tremendous resource for law students who are interested in creating mindfulness programs,” Charles said. “We all benefit from the experiences of each other.”

Learn more about the MILS student division>>

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Wolf Appointed to Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections http://law.gsu.edu/2017/01/03/wolf-appointed-secretarys-advisory-committee-human-research-protections/ Tue, 03 Jan 2017 20:13:38 +0000 http://law.gsu.edu/?p=198275 Leslie Wolf, Georgia State Law professor and director of the Center for Law, Health & Society, was appointed to the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections (SACHRP) in December.

The committee provides expert advice and recommendations to the secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and… more »

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Leslie Wolf, Georgia State Law professor and director of the Center for Law, Health & Society, was appointed to the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections (SACHRP) in December.

Leslie Wolf

Leslie Wolf, professor of law and director of the Center for Law, Health & Society

The committee provides expert advice and recommendations to the secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on issues pertaining to the protection of human subjects in research. Wolf will be one of 11 voting public members. SACHRP members are appointed to four-year terms.

“Having spent almost two decades working to protect human subjects while facilitating vital research, I am honored to serve as a SACHRP member and have the opportunity to inform federal policy on human subjects protections,” Wolf said.

Wolf has focused on ethical issues in her research. Before joining the Georgia State Law faculty in 2007, she was on faculty at the University of California San Francisco. As a member of the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies Policy and Ethics Core, she provided advice to prevention scientists on how to protect human subjects while conducting cutting-edge HIV/AIDS research, often among vulnerable populations.

Wolf also served on the UCSF institutional review board, which reviews research involving human subjects before it begins to protect the rights and welfare of human subjects. She also served on the UCSF embryonic stem cell review committee.

Wolf’s research has tackled a number of human research issues. Her research on Certificates of Confidentiality, a legal tool that facilities the conduct of important, but sensitive research, has established her as the leading expert on them. She presented her research team’s findings on certificates to SACHRP, which later released recommendations on improving confidentiality protections.

Wolf also presented her research findings on IRB conflicts of interest to the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections. She is widely known for her work on research involving stored biological specimens.

Since coming to Georgia State, Wolf has regularly taught a course on human subjects research. She was recently appointed as an education liaison for the Georgia State Human Research Protections Program.

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Bliss Teaches Importance of Clinical Legal Education and Access to Justice in India http://law.gsu.edu/2016/12/09/bliss-teaches-importance-clinical-legal-education-access-justice-india/ Fri, 09 Dec 2016 19:30:03 +0000 http://law.gsu.edu/?p=196581 Lisa Radtke Bliss, clinical professor, associate dean of experiential education and co-director of the Health Law Partnership (HeLP) Legal Services Clinic, traveled to India in November to teach the course, “Clinical Legal Education and Access to Justice,” at National Law University, Delhi (NLU).

“I taught NLU students about access… more »

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Lisa Radtke Bliss, clinical professor, associate dean of experiential education and co-director of the Health Law Partnership (HeLP) Legal Services Clinic, traveled to India in November to teach the course, “Clinical Legal Education and Access to Justice,” at National Law University, Delhi (NLU).

“I taught NLU students about access to justice issues and clinical education methods, and, they taught me about their legal education and justice system,” Bliss said. “We worked together to understand where we had things in common and how different ideas about clinical education can be applied to specific issues that are being faced by populations in India who are most in need of help.”

The course explored various forms of clinical legal education and how it can support students’ development as professionals. Bliss also explained the impact clinical education can have on society’s future through improving access to justice and building a network of ethical, competent and professional lawyers.

During the course, Bliss outlined the models of clinical education most suitable to India’s legal and legal education systems. Students participated in activities to learn how law clinics can be responsive to the justice needs in their communities and designed different models of community education and service clinics to help address those needs.

“At the end of each day, students shared their takeaways and how they expected to apply those lessons in practice,” Bliss said. “One of the things they found most beneficial was the course’s experiential format approach to teaching interviewing skills and techniques. The expressed how important and necessary those skills will be in their roles as professionals.”

The course was funded by India’s government and organized through the Ministry of Human Resource Development and Global Initiative for Academic Networks (GIAN) in Higher Education. GIAN is a program that invites global academic and industry experts to share their expertise and experiences to help enhance academic resources in India and address issues facing Indian communities.

Bharti Yadav, assistant professor at NLU, Delhi, invited Bliss to teach the course because of her vast experience promoting access to justice and clinical legal education through Georgia State Law clinics and experiential programs. The course was open to students from NLU, Delhi and other universities.

“Students had a very enriching experience in Professor Bliss’ class. It broadened their understanding of access to justice and how clinical legal education can be practiced in law school,” Yadav said. “And, they benefitted from the valuable inputs and suggestions she gave.”

On the last day of the course, Bliss’ students taught her a few things as they discussed the differences and similarities between India and the United States over a traditional Indian lunch.

“We enjoyed talking about our cultures. We shared our favorite Netflix shows, and I surprised them by my love for spicy things,” she said. “They made a poster for me with messages of appreciation, and we took some silly photos to celebrate our time together. They also asked who my favorite student was, which made me laugh. Even though I had a long journey home, I smiled the whole way.”

Bliss’ visit coincided with the Indian holiday Diwali, known as the Hindu festival of lights, which celebrates the triumph of light over darkness. Traditions during the five-day celebration include exchanging sweets and gifts, lighting candles, called diyas, decorating homes with colorful lights and rangoli – patterns created with flower petals, colored rice or powder – and large fireworks displays.

“While there are many festivals in India, this one is particularly special and widely celebrated with many traditions,” Bliss said. “I was privileged to spend the holiday with Professor Yadav and participated in her family’s traditions. I learned so much about Indian culture. Being able to visit during Diwali and share in an Indian family’s celebration of this festival was an experience I will never forget.”

Bliss says that each experience she has teaching and presenting abroad informs her research and scholarship, which she finds important for fellow professors and Georgia State Law.

“International faculty exchange programs help Georgia State Law establish relationships that further the education, research and scholarship of our students and faculty,” Bliss said. “It is through these opportunities that we develop our global knowledge. For law professors, it is particularly important, because not only are we focusing on research, we are also increasing the exchange of knowledge about law, legal systems and justice.”

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HeLP Provides MLP Model for Other Schools, including ones in Macon, S.C. http://law.gsu.edu/2016/12/08/help-provides-mlp-model-schools-including-one-macon/ Thu, 08 Dec 2016 19:59:57 +0000 http://law.gsu.edu/?p=197048 In 2014, Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal signed SB 352, authorizing government funding of medical-legal partnerships (MLPs) that meet specific standards and making Georgia the second state after New York to endorse MLPs. Health Legislation and Advocacy students at Georgia State Law helped draft the bill under the direction of Sylvia B. Caley (M.B.A. ’86,… more »

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Sylvia Caley (M.B.A.'86, J.D. '89

Sylvia Caley (M.B.A.’86, J.D. ’89) and HeLP colleagues helped start one in Macon among Mercer University School of Law, Navicent Health and the Georgia Legal Services Program.

In 2014, Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal signed SB 352, authorizing government funding of medical-legal partnerships (MLPs) that meet specific standards and making Georgia the second state after New York to endorse MLPs. Health Legislation and Advocacy students at Georgia State Law helped draft the bill under the direction of Sylvia B. Caley (M.B.A. ’86, J.D. ’89), clinical professor of law, director of the Health Law Partnership (HeLP) and co-director of HeLP Legal Services Clinic.

With the passage of the bill, Caley was hopeful more communities would create medical-legal partnerships throughout Georgia. She and HeLP colleagues helped start one in Macon among Mercer University School of Law, Navicent Health and the Georgia Legal Services Program.

“When we established HeLP, one of the primary goals was to serve as a model for the development of other programs. We are honored to have been able to assist Macon in the development of its MLP,” Caley said.

The lawyer designated for the new Macon partnership, Tara Vogel (J.D. ’14), is familiar with HeLP and jumped at the chance to be part of the team in Macon.

“I was a student in the HeLP Clinic and loved my time there,” Vogel said. “Through that experience, I learned that when a person is facing a health problem, the last thing they should have to worry about is a legal issue causing or exacerbating the medical concern. Particularly for the low income or elderly, a medical-related legal barrier can have severe consequences. I wanted to join our MLP to help make a difficult time in a person’s life a little easier by removing any legal obstacles.”

The Macon MLP’s client base spans more than 20 counties, and Vogel considers one of the partnership’s greatest benefits the combined resources and efforts of the three organizations involved.

“Each partner organization has an honest desire to improve the lives of our patients/clients, and they understand the unique challenges that serving rural areas creates,” Vogel said. “Combining our resources and efforts will allow us to reach more people than we do individually.”

The MLP is located at the Navicent hospital, allowing the legal and medical teams to closely work together to achieve results.

“This proximity has helped quickly establish a good relationship between medical workers and the partnership and has allowed for a quicker exchange of information,” Vogel said. “I already feel like I am a part of the team for each patient/client and that my legal contribution is just one factor that assists the patient in achieving their health goals.”

Vogel said Georgia State Law and HeLP have been an invaluable resource to the Macon partnership. “Sylvia Caley and the rest of the HeLP team have met with us many times, answering questions, offering advice, sharing sample forms, etc. We are extremely grateful for their guidance and support.”

Caley and members of the HeLP Clinic have provided their consulting services to other locations, including Case Western Reserve School of Law and Rainbow Children’s Hospital in Cleveland, Ohio, and the law and medical schools and legal services program in Memphis, Tenn.

In May, Emily Suski, who taught Family Law and was a clinical supervising attorney for the HeLP Clinic, was recruited to start an MLP at the University of South Carolina School of Law. She’ll apply her learnings from HeLP to develop a beneficial partnership in that community.

“Other groups seek our counsel because we have three community partners committed to establishing and sustaining our MLP: Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta Legal Aid Society and Georgia State Law,” Caley said. “We have a model program of offering direct client services, professional education programs, systemic advocacy, and program evaluation, research and scholarship.”

With their focus still on MLP expansion in Georgia, Caley and her team have a meeting planned in December with physicians in Augusta.

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Assar Named Best Overall Oralist at National Health Law Moot Court Competition http://law.gsu.edu/2016/11/14/assar-named-best-overall-oralist-national-health-law-moot-court-competition/ Mon, 14 Nov 2016 15:22:49 +0000 http://law.gsu.edu/?p=193396 Three Georgia State Law students, Yasmin Assar (J.D. ’18), Nathan Chong (J.D. ’18) and Matt Sessions (J.D. ’17) advanced to the octofinal round in the National Health Law Moot Court Competition Nov. 4-5 in Carbondale, Illinois. Assar beat out members of 29 other teams to win awards for Best Preliminary Oralist and Best… more »

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Yasmin Assar (J.D. '18) and Nathan Chong (J.D. '18)

Yasmin Assar (J.D. ’18) (left) beat out members of 29 other teams to win awards for Best Preliminary Oralist and Best Overall Oralist. She and Nathan Chong (J.D. ’18) and Matt Sessions (J.D. ’17) advanced to the octofinal round in the National Health Law Moot Court Competition Nov. 4-5 in Carbondale, Illinois.

Three Georgia State Law students, Yasmin Assar (J.D. ’18), Nathan Chong (J.D. ’18) and Matt Sessions (J.D. ’17) advanced to the octofinal round in the National Health Law Moot Court Competition Nov. 4-5 in Carbondale, Illinois. Assar beat out members of 29 other teams to win awards for Best Preliminary Oralist and Best Overall Oralist.

“I was completely shocked when my name was called as winning best oralist,” Assar said. “When I heard my name I think my jaw literally dropped to the floor.”

The competition problem dealt with a constitutional rights violation in the criminal context, Assar said. The teams submitted a brief at the end of September and then attended the competition for oral arguments. Teams had to argue for both the petitioner and respondent during the preliminary round.

To prepare for the competition, members of the team co-wrote the brief and spent around a month preparing for the oral argument portion.

“We divided the problem up by issues on certiorari. Our student coach, Matt Sessions, set up tentative schedule for completing research and drafts and we wrote our individual portions then combined them to compile the brief,” Chong said. “We then edited it to make sure it read as a single voice.”

Other members of moot court acted as judges, asking questions and providing feedback. “The help from other moot court members really gave us a chance to think about issues we may not have considered. Their feedback was indispensable in our preparation for the completion,” Assar said.

Though there was not a faculty coach for the competition, Jennifer Chiovaro (J.D. ’85), senior principal lecturer, assisted with the written portion of the completion.

“Professor Chiovaro was a huge help for brief drafting,” Chong said. Additionally, Sessions provided advice and feedback throughout the whole process.

After advancing to the octofinal round, the team was knocked out by the number one seeded team at the competition, The Barksdale Warriors.

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Students, Professor Collect 200+ Books for Fugees Family http://law.gsu.edu/2016/11/02/students-professor-collect-200-books-fugees-family/ Wed, 02 Nov 2016 15:34:52 +0000 http://law.gsu.edu/?p=191462 Georgia State Law Professor Jonathan Todres and students Chae Mims (J.D. ’17), and Min Ji Kim (J.D. ’18) delivered more than 200 donated books on Oct. 21 to the Fugees Family, a Clarkston-based nonprofit organization that works with refugee children.

The books were the culmination of a drive sponsored by Georgia… more »

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Fugees Family Book Drive

Georgia State Law Professor Jonathan Todres and students Chae Mims (J.D. ’17), and Min Ji Kim (J.D. ’18) delivered more than 200 donated books on Oct. 21 to the Fugees Family, a Clarkston-based nonprofit organization that works with refugee children.

Georgia State Law Professor Jonathan Todres and students Chae Mims (J.D. ’17), and Min Ji Kim (J.D. ’18) delivered more than 200 donated books on Oct. 21 to the Fugees Family, a Clarkston-based nonprofit organization that works with refugee children.

The books were the culmination of a drive sponsored by Georgia State University College of Law’s Center for Law Health & Society. Three student organizations, the Student Health Law Association, Parents Attending Law School and International and Comparative Law Society, spearheaded the book drive. Georgia Perimeter College, now a new part of Georgia State University, also helped to collect books.

Fugees Family Book Drive

Georgia State Law students Chae Mims (J.D. ’17), Professor Jonathan Todres, and Min Ji Kim (J.D. ’18), visited withLuma Mufleh (right) and the Fugees Family, a Clarkston-based nonprofit organization that works with refugee children when they dropped off the books.

Human Rights in Children’s Literature is about how children learn about their rights and their duties to respect others’ rights,” Todres said. “Ensuring children know their rights is empowering, and as Fugees Family aims to empower refugee children through its work, this was a natural fit. We’re happy to be able to support their work in any way we can.”

The book drive was held in conjunction with a book signing and presentation by Todres for his book, Human Rights in Children’s Literature: Imagination and the Narrative of Law (Oxford University Press 2016), which he co-wrote with Sarah Higinbotham.

“While delivering the books [to the Fugees Family], I got to observe students’ book report presentations in an assembly” said Mims, president of the International and Comparative Law Society. “Not only did the students give presentations, but they also offered each student candid feedback. The feedback demonstrated a bond and a genuine support the students had for one another.”

“When we visited the Fugees Family, we had the pleasure of sitting in on the morning assembly where the students presented book reports,” said Kim, the Student Health Law Association member who picked up and delivered the books. “The students discussed difficult themes of hope, good and evil, family and community. It was inspiring to hear the students talk about how the themes of the books related to their lives and experiences”

Founded as a soccer program by Luma Mufleh, the Fugees Family runs the Fugees Academy, the only school in the nation that is dedicated to refugee education. It also provides year-round soccer programs for children ages 10-18, after-school tutoring and a summer enrichment camp. The academy enrolls more than 100 students from more than 20 countries. Mufleh was also named one of CNN’s “Heroes of 2016.”

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