Blogs

Paul Milich

Lawyer Advocacy: Required Skills Training in the Second Year

Posted On April 5, 2017 by Paul S. Milich, Professor of Law and Director of the Advocacy Program

All Georgia State law students must take Lawyering Advocacy in the spring semester of their second year. The course is taught in small sections of 12 students by a practicing lawyer, with students handling two cases.

The first, a civil dispute, takes the students from client interviewing, initial pleadings and discovery, to briefing and arguing… more »

Moot Court Teams Fare Well at Notable Competitions

Three of Georgia State Law’s moot court teams recently participated in international, national and regional competitions—earning honors at each.

Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition

Katherine Krouse (J.D. ’18), Thomas Johnson (J.D. ’18), William Enfinger (J.D. ’18) and Meghan Gordon (J.D. ’17) competed in the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition in New… more »

Spring Time Fun in Atlanta

Posted On March 23, 2017 by Julio Perez-Bravo (B.A. ’15/J.D. ’18)

Springtime not only brings warmer weather to the city of Atlanta, but also an array of diverse events that suits almost everyone’s needs.

Check out the list of events below:

1. Atlanta Fair, February 24 – April 2 Come out to the fair and ride the ferris wheel, the Flying Dutchman, or the 45-foot Ring… more »

Marie Wilcox (J.D. '16)

Wilcox (J.D. ’16) Publishes in ABI Journal

The American Bankruptcy Institute Journal published “The Federal Student Loan Bubble,” by Marie Wilcox (J.D. ’16) in its February issue.

After taking visiting assistant professor of law Summer Chandler’s bankruptcy class, Wilcox became interested in student loan debt and bankruptcy. To fulfill her research writing requirement, she chose to… more »

In Their Words: Trey Kelley (J.D. ’14)

Why did you decide to pursue a career in politics? From an early age, my parents, both public school teachers, instilled in me the value of community service. After graduating from Shorter University, my wife, Amy, and I moved back to my hometown of Cedartown, where we quickly became re-engaged in our community through the… more »

In Their Words – Judge Belinda E. Edwards (J.D. ’90)

Why did you pursue a career in law? I wanted to make a positive difference in my community and in the lives of others.

As a child of the civil rights movement, raised in the segregated South, I experienced firsthand discrimination and the adverse effects of unequal justice. I realized early that it was the… more »

Is Trump’s Nominee Neil Gorsuch a Judicial or a Political Appointment?

On Tuesday, federal appeals court Judge Neil Gorsuch took home the red rose when President Donald Trump nominated him to the Supreme Court to fill the vacancy left by the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

So is he everything the Republicans hoped for when they decided to ignore the nomination of Merrick Garland, and… more »

‘You Can Chase Your Dreams,’ Jessica Leiva (J.D. ’19)

Jessica Leiva (J.D. ’19) knew she wanted to be a lawyer since she was a teenager. But her dreams were pushed aside after she graduated from college and entered the workforce. The birth of her son propelled her to set an example for him.

Although she had proven successful in other endeavors—she was the first… more »

Chief Justice Cites Georgia State Law Professor in State of Judiciary Address

Addressing a special joint session of the Georgia Assembly on Jan. 25, Georgia’s new chief justice, P. Harris Hines, cited Georgia State University College of Law professor Clark Cunningham for his work in developing the state’s new law student practice rules adopted in 2015 by the Supreme… more »

Marshall Moderates World Bank Panel on Cities

On Dec. 5, Professor John T. Marshall moderated a panel at the World Bank’s 2016 Conference on Law, Justice, and Development, exploring how individual cities can combat climate change and the policies underlying such a strategy.

One day of the four-day conference was devoted just to the law, of which Marshall’s… more »