Admissions FAQ

Gus Aleman, part-time student, frequently asked questions
“Georgia State has a great part-time program for current professionals who don’t want to sacrifice their careers to obtain their legal educations. They work to provide part-timers with all the same opportunities that full-time students get.”

Gustavo Aleman (J.D. ’15)

In 2013, the median GPA is 3.38 and the median LSAT score is 159.
The full-time program takes an average of three years. The part-time program takes four to five years.
97 percent of our students graduate.
Studies show that undergraduate GPA and LSAT scores strongly predict the level of a student’s performance in the first year of law study, and both are significant factors in admissions decisions. Each committee member will review your entire file, including the personal statement and letters of recommendation.
It is extremely important to prepare the best you can for your first attempt at the LSAT because substantial increases in scores are rare. However, the admissions committee will review all LSAT scores received in the last three years.
The personal statement gives you an opportunity to describe yourself, your interest in law school, and the goals you seek to achieve with a J.D. Include specific information about your abilities beyond the data in your application and consider it as a sample of your writing ability and thought process. The personal statement should be no more than two double-spaced pages.
No. The Admissions Committee considers each student’s credentials regardless of residence.
Educators or employers are preferred. Your advocate should be someone who is able to comment specifically about your intellectual ability, work habits, dependability, thoroughness and other characteristics.
Yes, Georgia State Law offers an LL.M. program for foreign-trained lawyers. The first class begins in fall 2015. Learn more.
 
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