Judge Randy Rich (J.D. ’92) Hears Case with Georgia Supreme Court

Randy Rich

Superior Court Judge Randolph G. “Randy” Rich (J.D. ’92) of the Gwinnett Judicial Circuit served in place of Justice Michael P. Boggs in the appeal of Hines v. State (S17G0024) before the Supreme Court of Georgia on Monday, Nov. 13.

Superior Court Judge Randolph G. “Randy” Rich (J.D. ’92) of the Gwinnett Judicial Circuit served in place of Justice Michael P. Boggs in the appeal of Hines v. State (S17G0024) before the Supreme Court of Georgia on Monday, Nov. 13.[/caption]

Superior Court Judge Randolph G. “Randy” Rich (J.D. ’92) of the Gwinnett Judicial Circuit served in place of Justice Michael P. Boggs in the appeal of Hines v. State (S17G0024) before the Supreme Court of Georgia on Nov. 13.

“Being asked to sit on the Georgia Supreme Court is probably the biggest honor I could ever receive as a judge,” Rich said.

Designated judges are appointed when a justice must recuse himself or herself from a particular case.

“I have served at the trial court level for 13 years, and I have been interested in serving on the Court of Appeals for some time, but I have never actually sat on an appellate case,” Rich said. “I am really excited for this opportunity. I think I will love it.”

Rich was appointed to the Superior Court by Gov. Nathan Deal in May 2014 and was reelected in 2016. Prior to his appointment to the Superior Court, he was elected to the Gwinnett State Court in 2004. Before his judicial service, he was a litigation partner in the law firm of Rich & Smith.

The Supreme Court of Georgia heard arguments in Hines v. State during its 10 a.m. session Monday. In this Fulton County case, a man is appealing his armed robbery conviction, arguing that his trial attorney was ineffective, in violation of his constitutional rights, for failing to challenge an indictment that was “fatally flawed.”

Rich, who will participate in the court’s decision, began preparing as soon as he received notice to serve.

“It is interesting to see how the appellate courts operate differently from the trial courts,” he said. “I have read all of the briefs. The court granted certiorari on two different but closely related issues. I think the case will be an important one for Georgia lawyers in the area of ineffective assistance of counsel.”

A native of Gwinnett County, Rich presides over the Gwinnett Drug Court and the Gwinnett Business Court. He serves as a master on the Bleckley Inn of Court, and has taught as an adjunct law professor at Georgia State Law, Emory University Law School and John Marshall Law School. He is married to Bonnie M. Rich (J.D. ’94), assistant director and supervising attorney in the Philip C. Cook Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic.

Print Friendly